24 March 2014

I recently posted this photo on my Instagram & Facebook for a few good laughs. But to reflect more seriously for just a moment… take a look at this. 

Nearly everything on here is more or less obsolete with the exception of the glasses and wallet. Both products Google (and others) are currently working to innovate. In sure at some point we’ll look back at this and also laugh at those objects as well. Don’t you think?

What’s the next object on the list to break through?

-Andrew

I recently posted this photo on my Instagram & Facebook for a few good laughs. But to reflect more seriously for just a moment… take a look at this.

Nearly everything on here is more or less obsolete with the exception of the glasses and wallet. Both products Google (and others) are currently working to innovate. In sure at some point we’ll look back at this and also laugh at those objects as well. Don’t you think?

What’s the next object on the list to break through?

-Andrew


9 December 2013

So close, yet so far away.  You’ve got to be thankful that parking meters have evolved beyond feeding coins, but who designed this interface? Where’s the flow? Where does one start? What should you read first?

So close, yet so far away.  You’ve got to be thankful that parking meters have evolved beyond feeding coins, but who designed this interface? Where’s the flow? Where does one start? What should you read first?


2 December 2013

tekinosf:

Getting in there. #welike

What interests us here at Bassett is not so much the technology itself, but what you do with it. Like Bill Buxton has said… “the technology is not the product, the experience it engenders is.”

Here’s a perfect example of some brilliant creativity that starts with a simple, albeit very real problem: getting up close and perosnal with wild animals. Getting a lens into a space where it has never been before produces some magical results. Behold…. 


11 November 2013

Pop-Up Culture Ad Infinitum :: Oakland's Murder Shrines | VICE United States

At Bassett & Partners we’re always fascinated by cultural phenomena, even if (or especially if) those phenomena are attached to an unexpected or sometimes even undesirable experience. We’re also fascinated by cultural rites and rituals; how they start and how they change over time. Which brings us to this week’s blog post.

After reading this brief interview on Vice’s website with photographer Megan Lent about the ‘murder shrines’ in Oakland, we couldn’t help but wonder if these memorials are yet another manifestation of the “pop-up” phenomenon that seems to have sprung up around so much of our modern culture and commerce. 

Obviously violence and homicide in Oakland are serious problems, and we certainly don’t want to make light of the matter by comparing these shrines to pop-up cafes, bookstores, or parties. But we found this stanza to be particularly insightful:

…these [shrines] serve some different purpose. They’re ephemeral in nature. They’re here and then they’re gone. They’re personal; they’re localized very uniquely. They’re right where it happened, usually. In a lot of the photos you can still see the blood on the sidewalks. It’s one last hurrah. Funerals are so impersonal—you all wear the same color, sing the songs, the reverend has the message, but this can just be much more personal.

The author touches on several interesting points here, and raises several thought-provoking questions:

- There’s an immediacy to these shrines that ‘traditional’ rites & rituals of mourning, e.g. funerals, may lack.

- Going to the actual location may be part of the grieving process for some people. Just as many make pilgrimages to holy places of birth, so to do they make personal ones for where someone close to them has perished. 

- There’s a personalized element that allows mourners to contribute something of their own to the departed in a more personal way. While the expression is sadly for the most awful of causes, it may be more meaningful to those grieving to share special mementos and items that may not ‘fit’ within the context of a traditional funeral.

- The lack of ‘the reverend’ here is an interesting one. We recently heard another story of small protestant churches and ministries holding services in pubs in order to attract a newer, younger audience. Could this be yet another instance of people re-intepreting or re-thinking the role of the spiritual leader? Is there something different - and even profound - about a reflexive spiritual experience?

- Is there something to be learned from this when designing temporary experiences for other meaningful rites in our lives? Are there other things we may create as ephemeral passings?

-/andrew


10 October 2013

Amazed by this recent GoPro ad. Seems that they’re moving beyond the extreme action sports realm and reaching into new emotional territories with categories like wildlife.

What strikes us as most compelling is that GoPro seems to be about capturing the impossible images of life, and seeing the world (and perhaps yourself) from an entirely new vantage point.

Great stuff.


10 October 2013

Some photos from a recent panel on product and design innovation at the Global Design Forum of which Tom was a featured guest.

Tom brought a great perspective to the panel, with talking points on the need for finding emotion in the research process, and how that’s connected back to actionable product strategy, citing case studies from both Nike and Sonosite, among others.

We were thrilled to be a part of this panel and congratulate all of the other panelists on a great dialogue as well as Carolyn Dailey for a great job moderating.


10 October 2013

A few select snaps from Bassett’s recent trip to New York City for Connecting II - the second chapter in the documentary series on the future of design and connectivity. Had a series of great interviews, including:

- Bre Pettis, CEO and Founder MakerBot Industries

- SMART Design Fellow Carla Diana

- SMART Design Partner Tucker Fort

- SMART Design Business Strategist Gordon Hui

- Mike Glaser, Program Director of Product Design, Drexel Univ.

- Bruce Nussbaum, Professor and Writer at the Parsons New School for Design

- Benedetta Piantella, Professor of Design at NYU ITP School

Great conversations that led to some great insights — very excited about where the film is headed!


21 August 2013

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the “Just Do It” tagline, Nike has created the following inspirational ad. As an agency partner of Nike’s for over 10 years (and even further back to Tom’s roots at Wieden+Kennedy), B&P is honored to work alongside many of the people at Nike who work hard every day to provide a platform for every human on earth to be an athlete.

For those not as familiar with the genesis of the now-iconic mantra…

Recalling killer Gary Gilmore’s famous last words before he was executed by firing squad in 1977 in Utah – “Let’s do it,” Gilmore said – it was 11 years later when Wieden tweaked the declaration and came up with an idea that would soon become iconic:

"Just Do It."

That was 1988. Nike, and Wieden+Kennedy, were never the same.

Nike Presents: Just Do It — Possibilities (by nike)


19 July 2013

To Be More Creative, Study The Great Ricky Gervais Dicking About Theory


19 July 2013

Bassett & Partners co-hosted a ‘Connecting’ film event at Google NY/WebMD last night in conjunction with the Advertising Research Foundation Young Pros industry group.

Assoc Dir of Research Andrew Casden moderated a panel of experts in research, brand planning, and digital strategy from top NY agencies like Wieden, Huge, and SapientNitro.

Great turnout and great discussion following the film. Thank you to the ARF and all guests who attended!